Feedback on Cambodia: Smiles, temples and poverty

Administrative

  • Visa (Tourism) 30 days validity, single entry (30$/pp + 5$/pp bribe + 2$/pp Stamp fee if you cross the border by land. According to the Belgian embassy in Cambodia, there is no way around it and you have to pay…). You have to pay in USD and they only accept either 1$, 2$, 10$ or 20$ notes (they are afraid of fake notes)!!
  • Currency: American Dollars (USD) and Riels (KHR); 1€ ~ 1,20 USD (April 2018) ; 1€ ~ 5000 KHR or 1$ ~ 4000 KHR. You usually pay everything over 1$ in USD and anything lower that 1$ in Riels. In that situation, you get the change in Riels.it is also possible to pay for everything in KHR.
  • Local bank fees : 4$ at each withdrawal in Cambodian banks (Maximum withdrawal of 1000$)
  • Languages : Cambodian and dialects, some French, some English, …

 


Our itinerary

 


Our stay

28/03/2018 – 11/04/2018 ; 15 days

 


Our best pictures

Siem Reap Angkor Temples replicas (1)
Angkor Wat replica and the author: Mr. Dy Proeung, Siem Reap
Angkor Wat (1)
Angkor Wat, Siem Reap
Angkor Wat (4)
Carvings, Angkor Wat, Siem Reap
Bayon Temple (2)
Bayon Temple, Siem Reap
Ta Prohm (1)
Ta Prohm Temple and its rock-eaters trees, Siem Reap

Ta Prohm (3)

Bantey Srei Temple (4)
Banteay Srei Temple
Bantey Srei Temple (2)
Carvings in Banteay Srei Temple, Siem Reap
Ta Som Temple (10)
Ta Som Temple, Siem Reap
Ta Som Temple (9)
Carvings in Ta Som Temple, Siem Reap
IMG_20180408_163146
Fountain and statue made of firearms, Battambang
IMG_3727
Bones and remnants in the Killing Caves, Phnom Sampov Hill, Battambang
IMG_3825
Bat cave, Phnom Sampov Hill, Battambang
IMG_3858
Bats path in the sky
IMG_20180407_133416
Banan temple, Battambang

 


Global and average daily expenses for two people

  • Admission (visa, temples and caves): 203€ (including 29€/pp Visa fee, 50€/pp Angkor three days pass and 17€/pp Angkor Small and Grand Circuit with guide and transport included)
  • Transport (Bus, minivan and tuk-tuk): 74€ (18,5€/pp bus, 6,5€/pp tuk-tuk, 12€/pp minivan)
  • Food: 191€ (1-2€/pp for a dish, 1€/milkshake or iced coffee, consider spending 6-7€/pp a day)
  • Hotel: 68€ (3-5€/night)
  • Tips (bank fees): 6€
  • Others (laundry, SIM cards, movie theater): 24€ (2,5€/pp to watch a movie in 3D in Siem Reap!, 3,5€/pp SIM card fee – 5Gb for 15 days)

 

Global expenses: 565€

Avergae daily expenses for two people: 36€ (excluding visa fees)

 


Global feedback

  • + + :
    • Siem Reap city (nice, lots of green spaces, breathable, quite clean and modern)
    • Angkor Temples
    • Battambang Bat Cave
    • History of Khmers civilisation
    • Nice people who smile a lot, like in Laos
    • Cheap accommodations (3-5€/night for a decent one)
    • Cheap food in general (1-2$/dish for local food)
  • – – :
    • English is not that widely spread, which blocks communication (even in tourist information centers!)
    • Corrupted borders (5$ bribe to get a visa and it is not negotiable…)
    • Beverages contain too much sugar, as in Laos (you have to ask for it to be sugarless every time)
    • Crappy roads (even worse than Laos)
    • Mass tourism in Siem Reap and they tend to overprice everything
    • Expensive transports (35€/pp to travel 200km, in opposition with 15€/pp by 500km in Laos)
    • Expensive Angkor temples pass
    • No local buses. They consider that minivans from private companies and tuk-tuks are local transports.
    • Harassment by taxi drivers and tuk-tuks (similar to India)
    • Scams by English teachers. They get to you with a nice sign and ask you to help teaching their students for a few weeks. As you usually do not have that much time, they ask for money. It may seems genuine, but people approached us the same way with identical signs in different cities. What a shame. As Europeans, you are always seen as bank accounts L
    • Buying toilet paper is a pain in the ass in small cities like Battambang (they use water to clean themselves, like in India)
    • Looks and behaviours from men towards me were sometimes weird and I was not comfortable with it. Two times I saw a man  slowly approaching me from my back, sit down for a few minutes to have a look at what I was doing on the computer, copy my facial expressions and throw me kisses…

 


Feedback and feelings

As we visited only two cities in Cambodia, it would be quite difficult to give an objective point of view about the country, globally speaking.

We loved Siem Reap for its modern feeling, is atmosphere and its trees along the river. Angkor temples are incredibly gorgeous, but the high price may be unaffordable for backpackers (We decided to buy the three days pass for 50€/pp).

We would have wanted to go for jungle trekking, in the Eastern part of the country, but we quickly dropped it out as it aws too expensive (350€/pp for a three days trek, including both guide and food).

Battambang was quite nice, but as we went to Siem reap right before, we were disappointed by that smaller, rural town. In Laos, we were bothered by ants colonies in the bathrooms and rooms generally speaking, but Battambang will remain the town in which we saw the most cockroaches ever (in streets and our rooms!).

In opposition with Laos, transportation costs are quite expensive, both within towns and from a town to another (Let’s say 0,8€/km with tuk-tuks and 17€/km per person with minivans). Organization is crap as it was in Laos (In Siem Reap, we booked tickets  to Battambang, but they forgot to pick us up at our hotel…) et drivers drop people off anywhere they want (not always when they were supposed to).

English was not common among Cambodians and even asking for a price was troublesome most of the time.

How about you? Ever been to Cambodia, or maybe planning to go there? Share your feelings with us!

 

Publicités

A) Siem Reap (ENG)

Update of our post about Siem Reap and Angkor temples, April 2018

28/03/2018 – 04/04/2018

 

Siem Reap in a few words

Capital of the Siem Reap Province, the city is famous for its proximity to Angkor Temples located barely 10 kilometers away.

Angkor temples spread over 400 sq.km. they were mainly built for religious purposes, but some of them as royal palaces by the Khmer Empire between the 9th and the 13th centuries. At the time, people used to live all around the temples and Angkor was the Capital of the Empire.The place was chosen on purpose. It is located right between the raw materials source (stones from the Kulen Mountain, 40 kilometers north from Angkor) and the food source (Tonle Sap lake, in the South).

Angkor Temples are spread over three sites:

  • Angkor Temples (see a non exhaustive list further), 10 kilometers away from the town
  • Bakong Temple, 13 kilometers East from Siem Reap
  • Banteay Srei, 40 kilometers North away from Siem Reap

Khmers are the historical ethnicity, while Cambodians are the Cambodia inhabitants (Chinese, Laotians, Vietnamese, etc). Most people are Theravada Buddhists, as in Thaïland, but it changed throughout History. Before the 10th century, people used to believe in “Animism”, polytheist religion revering Nature, trees, mountains, rivers and so on. They believed that everything is connected through Energy and they used to perform sacrifices to please the Gods. Later on, in the 10th century, merchants from India came to trade and introduced Hindouism and Bouddhism. Khmer Kings adopted Hinduism for centuries, which explains why the Angkor Temples were built to honour the Trinity Gods of Hinduism (see our post on Kathmandou here) and why all writings and Temples names are in Sanskrit. The names commonly used are actually nicknames given by local people, referring to what they found inside. In Banteay Srei temple, they are many engraved statues of women, goddesses, hence the name Banteay Srei – the women temple. It is said that when people discovered the Bayon temple, it was completely overrun by banyan trees, sacred in Buddhism for being the ones under which the prophet Buddha became a Buddha – an illuminated one.

At the time, Cambodia consisted of 59 provinces instead of 25 as it is today and Hinduism lasted for five centuries (until the 15th-16th century) when they switched to Buddhism.

FYI, among these three religions, Buddhism is the only one in which you will not find sacrificial rituals to please the God(s). In Buddhism, you will have to respect five fundamental pillars:

  • Do not kill
  • Do not lie
  • Do not steal
  • Do not cheat on your wife/husbandDo not drink alcohol (which is really the one people choose not to respect :p)

Kings used to adopt Hinduism in order to conquer territories, as this religion allows people to kill to please the Gods! Pretty convenient is it not?

The city’s nightlife all about the Pub Street, with countless bars and restaurants and attracts tourists from all over the world.

The usual currency is the American Dollar (USD) and prices tend to be rounded up to the nearest 1$. Change is often given in Khmer Riels (KHR) and 1$ = 4000 KHR, 1€ = 5000 KHR. Generally speaking, food is pretty cheap (1-5$), but bottled water is expensive (0,50$ for temperate, 1$ for a cold one). If you want to save up money on water, we suggest you to buy them in packs of 6 in a shop for 1.5-2.5$.


Reaching Siem Reap from Laos (4000 islands)

  • Trip from the 4000 islands to the border. There are several possibilities:
  1. All-in-one package: Don Det to Nakasang by small boat, followed by Nakasang to the border by bus : 235.000 LAK/pp (+ 4% fee if you want to pay by MasterCard)
  2. Don Det to Nakasang by small boat, followed by Nakasang to the border by bus: 210.000 LAK/pp + 15.000 LAK/pp or 20.000 LAK/pp (from Don Det or Don Khone, respectively)

We did not know in Pakse that we would have to pay credit card fees on the islands (we did not have any cash left). Should have we known, we would definitely have bought the indefinite time tickets for 210.000 LAK/pp at Laos Adventurer Tour!

  • Trip from the Cambodian border to Siem Reap:

 Here comes the best part of them all :p Be prepared to face corrupt customs officers from both the Cambodian and Laotian side!

On the Laotian side, they will try to take 2$/pp as stamp fee. We waited for an hour and managed to pay “only” 1$/pp.

On the Cambodian side, they asked for 35$/pp instead of 30$/pp, as we saw on the web, but we unfortunately did not have the energy anymore to discuss.

Here are a few tips and advice:

  • Both Laotian and Cambodian visas price is in USD. You can used other currencies, but the customs officers will charge you a crazy fee. If you do not have any, don’t worry! There is a Bank (a real one, in front of all the ATM’s, close to the bus station in Nakasang that you can go to either at your arrival in the 4000 islands, either when you get to the bus station on the way out. Withdraw as much LAK as you are allowed to in the ATM’s (1.500.000 or 2.000.000 LAK). They will exchange 1.250.000 LAK against 200$ (0.8$ fee), which is great, trust me!
  • At the bus station in Nakasang, you will find people who will offer you their help to cross the border. They will ask for 40$/pp and your passport. Most people actually do and it is not a scam, you will definitely get your passport back. However, as you can see above, it is even more expensive than what we paid and we also saw them only give 20$ for 20 passports to the customs officers… But they did not waste any second of their life.
  • Do not worry if you want to fight your way through customs without paying the stamp fees. They told us that our bus would leave without us, but they did not.
  • Do not leave Laos until you get that stamp, unless you want to go beck (by foot).

Accomodations

Most guesthouses have rooms fr 15$ in the centre and all around Pub Street, but if you go the the western part of town (2km aay from the Pub Street), prices get way lower.

We stayed at the “Mei Gui Guesthouse” for 7$/night with a private bathroom and fan. They also have AC rooms for 10$/night.

Hostels and youth hostels have dormitory beds for 6$/pp.


Food

Most restaurants have khmer food, western food and sometimes Indian food for 1-10$/pp depending on the place.

If you like street food, there are plenty of them along the river in the centre. You can have dinner for 1-1,5$/pp.

Exotic Siem Reap Food

Khmer BBQ Siem Reap
Khmer barbecue
Lok Lak chicken Rice Siem Reap
Chicken Lok Lak and Rice
Siem Reap Street Food (1)
A few pics of street food in Siem Reap

Siem Reap Street Food (2)

Siem Reap Street Food (3)


Activities

  • Angkor Temples, 10km away from town :
    • Tickets are sold 4km away from town, in the direction of the temples, but definitely not close to the entrance. We got there on foot a day before, but it is not necessary as tours will always take you there first thing in the morning. Here is the pricelist:
      • 37$ for a 1 day pass
      • 62$ for a 3 days pass, allowing you to enter the park three times in a period of seven days
      • 72$ for a 7 days pass, allowing you to enter the park seven times in a period of 30 days
    • Tours:
      • Small Circuit: 10$/pp (AC minivan, 37km tour with an English speaking guide)
        • Angkor Wat
        • Ta Phrom
        • Bayon
        • South Gate
        • Sunset at Bakheng Hill (don’t go if it is cloudy, you will nt see a thing)
      • Grand Circuit: 11$/pp (AC minivan, 37km tour with an English speaking guide). This one was better and the temples more beautiful than the Small Tour
        • Banteay Srei
        • Neah Pean
        • Ta Som
        • Preah Khan
        • East Mebon
        • Pre Rup
  • Bakong Temples, 13km away from town. Entry fees are included in the Angkor pass. You can reach them by bicycle (1$/day) or by tuk-tuk (20$)
  • Reproductions of Angkor temples, Banteay Srei and Bayon (1.5$/pp). Located in the northern part of town, but still close to the centre. The carver, a nice, full of passion 70 years old guy manages the place and is proud to show you around.
  • Angkor National Museum
  • Park close to the National museum and its trees full of bats, day and night. There is also a Tourism information centre and you can get information about Angkor Temples and everything around. Only one out of the three people in there speaks proper English though.
  • Pub street
  • Old Market

A few pics of the town

Siem Reap
Viewpoint from one the several bridges
Siem Reap Angkor Temples replicas (1)
Angkor Wat replica and its carver: M. Dy Proeung (Survivor of the Red Khmers)
Siem Reap Angkor Temples replicas (2)
Bayon Temple replica by M. Dy Proeung
Angkor Temples map
Map with all temples except Banteay Srei, which is 40 km away North


Angkor Small Circuit pics

Programme:

PS: Clicking on the underlined temples name will get you to a Wikipedia webpage 😀

 

Angkor Wat, temple dedicated to honour Vishnu

Angkor Wat (1)

Angkor Wat (2)

Angkor Wat (3)

Angkor Wat (4)

Angkor Wat (5)

Angkor Wat (6)
Khmer carvers were very thourough in their work: The sunset light created a shadow over on the walls and the columns design made it look like Angkor Wat itself!

Bayon Temple

Bayon Temple (1)

Bayon Temple (2)

Bayon Temple (3)


Ta Prohm Temple

Ta Prohm (1)

Ta Prohm (2)

Ta Prohm (3)

Ta Prohm (4)

Ta Prohm (5)

Ta Prohm (6)

Ta Prohm (7)

Ta Prohm (8)



Angkor Grand Circuit pics

  • Bantey Srei Temple (Built by Yasjnavaraha, King Rajendravarman II and Jayavaman  V conselor during the 10th century AC)
  • East Mebon Temple (Built by King Rajendravarman II during the 10th century AC)
  • Neak Pean Temple (Built by King Rajendravarman II during the 10th century  AC)
  • Preah Khan Temple (Built by King Jayavaman VII during the 12th century AC)
  • Ta Som Temple (Built by King Jayavaman VII during the 12th century AC)

PS: Clicking on the underlined temples name will get you to a Wikipedia webpage 😀

Bantey Srei Temple, built in sandstone to honour Shiva

Bantey Srei Temple (1)

Bantey Srei Temple (2)

Bantey Srei Temple (3)

Bantey Srei Temple (4)

Bantey Srei Temple (5)


Ta Som Temple

Ta Som Temple (1)

Ta Som Temple (2)

Ta Som Temple (3)

Ta Som Temple (4)

Ta Som Temple (5)

Ta Som Temple (6)

Ta Som Temple (7)

Ta Som Temple (8)

Ta Som Temple (9)

Ta Som Temple (10)


Preah Khan Temple

Preah Khan Temple (1)

Preah Khan Temple (2)

Preah Khan Temple (3)

Preah Khan Temple (4)

Preah Khan Temple (5)


Neak Pean Temple

Neak Pean (1)

Neak Pean (2)


East Mebon Temple

East Mebon (1)

East Mebon (2)

East Mebon (3)

East Mebon (4)


Pre Rup Temple

Pre Rup Temple (1)

Pre Rup Temple (2)

Pre Rup Temple (3)

Pre Rup Temple (4)

 

Next step: Bus to the city of Battambang, where we will see remains from the Red Khmers tortures caves.

B) Battambang (ENG)

04/04/2018 – 10/04/2018

 

A few words about Battambang

The city is the Capital of Battambang province, which is known in Cambodia to be the leading rice producer of the country. Tourism is still in development and the city is really small compared with the huge city of Siem Reap.

We went there in the dry season, with temperatures reaching 35°C during the day and 25°C at night. Locals told us that you eventually get used to it, but we still haven’t :p

 


Reaching Battambang from Siem Reap

In Siem Reap streets, you can find plenty of small shops selling bus tickets to Cambodia’s major cities. Buses run at 7:30AM, 9:30AM and 10:30AM every day. There are two prices: 5$/pp (4€) for a 3 hours bus and 4$/pp (3€) for a 7 hours bus.

As for us, we booked a bus departing at 9:30AM for 3 hours. A tuk-tuk was supposed to pick us up, but never arrived :p We got back to the shop to get information and the guy told us that he forgot to pick us up, just like that. Well, it happens right? Travelling in Asia never ceases to surprise us :p Eventually, we got two seats in the last bus of the day, to discover that we were gonna be in there for 7 straight hours… 😀

 


Accomodations

Prices tend to be a bi t lower than Siem Reap for a private room+bathroom:

  • Hotel: 15-20$ (12-16€)
  • Guesthouse: 4-10$ (3-8€)

We stayed the two first nights at the « Tomato backpackers Guesthouse », – 4$/night, then we left for the Por Chey Guesthouse, – 5$/night. The second one was less cheap, but we started to get tired of killing at least two cockroaches a day!

 


Food

There are not a lot of restaurants in town and we unfortunately were not satisfied by but a few of them. We went several times to the same restaurants:

  • « Mat Coffee – Dim Sum »: Small restaurant close to a fountain in the northern part of town. Cheap food (2$ / 1-2€) and nice people, but they only open in the evening.
  • Food stalls in front of th « Angkor Comfort Hotel ». Food is quiet good, but you should definitely go there to try their milkshakes at 0,75-1$ (0,6-0,8€).
  • « Mariyan Pizza House », close to the temple Wat Sangker and to the popular hostel « Here be Dragons ». We had lunch and dinner every day for 2-3$/pp for a dish (including 1 beverage a person). PS: Their « iced coffee » is gorgeous and without sugar.

 

IMG_20180406_124230
Bami goreng and Iced Coffee
IMG_20180408_114018_1
One of Queenie’s test: Do you want milk with an egg? Seems good, I will give it a try! Come on, why didn’t you tell me that the egg would come raw…
IMG_20180408_115429
Lok Lak with crispy pork and steam rice
IMG_20180402_135907
Sea food and street food

Activities

Two days are really enough to see everything around:

  • Crocodiles farm
  • Barseat Temple
  • Wat Phnom Ek Temple / Ruins
  • Wat Sangker Temple
  • Phnom Sampeau/Sampov Hill:
    • Killing Caves
    • Bat Caves
  • Phnom Banan Hill:
    • Wat Banan Temple / Ruins
    • Bamboo train

PS1: In the list above, only the crocodiles farm and Wat Sangker Temple are in within the city. Everything elseis located 15km away from it.

PS2 : During Pol Pot time, Killing caves were natural caves used to dispose of ennemies of the regime. More than 3 million educated people were tortured and killed there (teachers, translators, scientists …)

PS3: « Bat caves » consist of tunnels inhabited by 6,5 millions of Wrinkle-lipped bats (Chaerephon plicatus), which only get out once every day from 5:45PM to sunset to hunt. They feed mostly on insects (crop destroyers), which saves up to 2000 tons of rice a year and eat 50 to 100% of their weight (15 grams, they are rather small) a day. As it is the number one province in rice farming, they are revered!

 

 


Pictures


A few pics of Battambang city

IMG_20180405_113046

IMG_20180409_134619

IMG_20180406_133917

IMG_20180406_134207

IMG_20180408_163146

IMG_3353

 

A few pics of Phnom Sampov Hill

Killing Caves, temples and viewpoint

IMG_3708
Torture scenes according to Bouddhist religion inflicted to sinners (drunks, love cheaters, gamblers, liars and thieves)
IMG_3727
Bones shrines in the Killing Cafves

IMG_3755

IMG_3762

IMG_20180407_171140

Bat Caves

IMG_3825

IMG_3858

 

A few pics of Banan Hill and Temple

IMG_3504

IMG_20180407_130508

IMG_20180407_131217

IMG_20180407_133416
These ruins are apparently a hundred years older than Angkor temples

IMG_3599

 

 

This is where our trip in Cambodia ends. We will head for Thailand next by bus that we booked at “Capitol tours” (maps.me) for 13$/pp (10,55€). The bus leaves at 7:45AM for a 8 to 9 hours trip.

Update: We talked about it in our next post (A) Bangkok (FR)) and definitely do not recommand this company because they did not drop us off in Khaosan road as they told us, but 7 km away from it in the center of Bangkok (I think that we were dropped off at the location referred as « Arrivals from Cambodia » on Maps.me). The guy got angry without reason and told us to get a taxi to Khaosan road (which costed us 300 THB – 8€ – that we divided among 6 people).

Our next posts will be related to the Southern part of Thailand and a summary of our expenses in Cambodia 😀

 

 

 

Bilan du Cambodge: Sourires, temples et pauvreté

Administratif

  • Visa (Tourisme) valable pour 30 jours, 1 entrée (30$/pp + 5$/pp de pot de vin + 2$/pp de « frais de tampon » si vous traversez par une frontière terrestre et « on n’y peut rien » d’après l’Ambassade de Belgique au Cambodge…). Attention, le visa se règle en USD uniquement et ils n’acceptent pas les billets de 50$ ou supérieurs (par peur des faux billets) !!
  • Monnaie : Dollars Américains (USD) ou Riels (KHR) ; 1€ ~ 1,20 USD (2018) ; 1€ ~ 5000 KHR ou 1$ ~ 4000 KHR. Dans la vie de tous les jours, il est courant de tout payer en USD, sauf lorsque le montant est inférieur à 1$, où on vous rend la monnaie en KHR. Si vous préférez, vous pouvez aussi tout payer en KHR.
  • Frais bancaires généraux : 4$ par retrait par les banques Cambodgiennes (retrait max 1000$)
  • Langue : Cambodgien et dialectes, un peu de Français, un peu d’Anglais, …

 


Notre itinéraire

 


Période et durée de notre séjour

28/03/2018 – 11/04/2018 ; 15 jours

 


Nos meilleures photos

Siem Reap Angkor Temples replicas (1)
Réplique d’Angkor Wat et son créateur : M. Dy Proeung, Siem Reap
Angkor Wat (1)
Angkor Wat, Siem Reap
Angkor Wat (4)
Bas-reliefs, Angkor Wat, Siem Reap
Bayon Temple (2)
Temple Bayon, Siem Reap
Ta Prohm (1)
Temple de Ta Prohm et ses arbres mangeurs de pierre, Siem Reap

Ta Prohm (3)

Bantey Srei Temple (4)
Temple de Banteay Srei
Bantey Srei Temple (2)
Bas-relief du temple de Banteay Srei, Siem Reap
Ta Som Temple (10)
Temple de Ta Som, Siem Reap
Ta Som Temple (9)
Bas-reliefs, Temple de Ta Som, Siem Reap

 

IMG_20180408_163146
Statue et fontaine, Battambang
IMG_3727
Ossements dans les Killing Caves, Colline de Phnom Sampov, Battambang
IMG_3825
Sortie des chauve-souris, Colline de Phnom Sampov, Battambang
IMG_3858
Trajectoire des chauve-souris dans le ciel
IMG_20180407_133416
Temple de Banan

 


Notre budget global et budget moyen pour nous deux 

 

  • Admission (visa, temples et grottes): 203€ (dont environ 29€/pp pour le Visa, 50€/pp pour le pass de deux jours d’Angkor et 17€/pp pour le Petit et Grand circuit d’Angkor en tour organisé avec guide)
  • Transport (Bus, minivan et tuk-tuk): 74€ (18,5€/pp bus, 6,5€/pp tuk-tuk, 12€/pp minivan)
  • Food: 191€ (1-2€/pp pour un plat, 1€/milkshake ou iced coffee, comptez environ 6-7€/pp par jour)
  • Hôtel: 68€ (3-5€/chambre la nuit)
  • Tips (frais bancaires): 6€
  • Autres (lessive, cartes SIM, cinéma): 24€ (2,5€/pp pour du 3D à Siem Reap!, 3,5€/pp pour une carte SIM avec 5Gb valable 15 jours)

Budget global : 565€

Budget moyen par jour pour deux personnes : 36€ (sans compter le visa)

 


Nos impressions générales

  • + + :
    • Siem Reap (ville agréable, avec beaucoup d’espaces verts, aérée, relativement propre et moderne)
    • Temples d’Angkor
    • Grottes à chauve-souris
    • Culture historique avec l’histoire des Khmers et des massacres
    • Population sympathique et souriante, comme au Laos
    • Hôtels bon marché (on peut trouver jusqu’à 3-5€/nuit)
    • Nourriture pas chère (en général 1-2$ par plat pour les plats locaux)
  • – – :
    • Barrière de la langue, très peu d’Anglais (Même dans certains centre d’infos de tourisme !)
    • Corruption aux frontières (5$ de bakchich pour le visa, non négociable…)
    • Boissons beaucoup trop sucrées (Précisez toujours « sans sucre » pour vos milkshakes si vous ne voulez pas devenir diabétiques)
    • Routes dans un état désastreux (encore pire qu’au Laos)
    • Tourisme de masse (dans certaines villes comme Siem Reap) et prix gonflés
    • Transports chers (35€/pp pour 200km, contre 15€/pp pour 500km au Laos)
    • Prix élevé du pass pour les temples d’Angkor
    • Absence de bus locaux. Les moyens de transports dits « locaux » sont des bus ou minivans de compagnies privées entre les villes et des tuk-tuks ou taxi dans les villes
    • Harcèlement incessant des tuk-tuks (comme en Inde)
    • Arnaques de soi-disant professeurs d’Anglais dans des écoles défavorisées (Ils se présentent avec une belle pancarte plastifiée et aimeraient que vous donniez des cours à leurs étudiants pendant plusieurs semaines. Accostant systématiquement des touristes, ils savent que vous allez décliner car vous n’avez pas le temps et vous demandent alors de donner de l’argent. Ce qui nous a mis la puce à l’oreille, c’est de rencontrer deux profs dans deux villes différentes avec la même pancarte et le même discours… C’est triste)
    • Calvaire pour trouver du PQ, dans les plus petites villes comme Battambang (comme en Inde, ils utilisent une douchette)
    • Certains regards et comportements d’hommes à Battambang me mettaient très mal à l’aise. Par deux fois, j’ai vu un mec s’approcher discrètement par derrière, s’asseoir pendant plusieurs minutes et regarder ce que je faisais sur le pc, mimer ou répéter quand je lui demandais ce qu’il voulait et même me lancer des bisous…

 


Nos conclusions

 

Nous n’avons visité que deux villes du Cambodge, donc il est assez difficile de donner un avis représentatif global pour le pays.

Nous avons apprécié Siem Reap pour sa modernité et ses grandes allées d’arbres le long de l’eau. Les nombreux Temples d’Angkor sont vraiment beaux, mais c’est dommage que le ticket soit si cher (nous avons pris le pass de deux jours à 50€/pp).

Nous aurions voulu faire quelques treks de plusieurs jours dans la jungle, dans l’Est du Cambodge, mais nous avons abandonné l’idée à contrecœur car c’était trop cher pour nous (il fallait compter environ 350€/pp pour trois jours pour le trek, le guide et la nourriture).

Battambang était plutôt sympa, mais c’est dommage pour elle que nous soyons passés par Siem Reap juste avant. Après le Laos et ses colonies entières de fourmis dans les salles de bains ou les chambres, Battambang restera la ville où nous avons vu le plus de cafards dans nos chambres.

Contrairement au Laos, le coût des transports en ville et entre les villes est assez élevé (Comptez 0,8€/km en général pour les tuk-tuks et 17€/100km par personne pour les minivans). Concernant l’organisation, c’est toujours aussi chaotique (on a même oublié de passer nous prendre à notre auberge de Siem Reap pour aller à Battambang !) et les chauffeurs déposent les gens n’importent où.

La barrière de la langue est vraiment très importante (Beaucoup moins à Siem Reap) et même demander le prix en mimant pose problème.

Et vous, qu’en pensez-vous? Vous aimeriez voir le Cambodge? Partagez vos impressions avec nous!

B) Battambang (FR)

04/04/2018 – 10/04/2018

 

Quelques mots sur la ville de Battambang

Capitale de la province de Battambang, principale productrice de riz au Cambodge. La ville est encore très peu touristique à l’heure actuelle et est assez petite, comparée à la gigantesque Siem Reap.

nous y sommes allés en plein dans la saison sèche, où la température moyenne est de 35°C le jour et 25°C la nuit… Autant vous dire qu’on a un petit peu cuit…

 


Comment atteindre Battambang depuis Siem Reap?

Vous pouvez trouver assez facilement des petites échoppes dans les rues de Siem Reap qui vendent des tickets de bus vers toutes les grosses villes. Pour aller à Battambang, il y a trois bus par jour, à 7h30,  9h30 et 10h30. On sait qu’il y avait un bus de 3h à 5$/pp (4€) et un autre de 7h à 4$/pp (3€).

Nous avions réservé celui de 3h vers 9h30 du matin et un tuk-tuk était sensé venir nous chercher (c’était inclus dans le prix). Comme il nous a oublié, on a dû retourner au shop, demander ce qu’il se passait, reprendre un ticket pour le bus de 10h30. Nous nous sommes donc retrouvés dans le bus de 7h… 😀

 


Où loger?

Les prix sont un peu plus bas qu’à Siem Reap pour une chambre avec sdb privative:

  • Hôtel: 15-20$ (12-16€)
  • GH: 4-10$ (3-8€)

Nous avons logé les deux premières nuits à la « Tomato backpackers GH », pour 4$/nuit, mais nous sommes ensuite partis à la Por Chey GH, pour 5$/nuit. C’était plus cher, mais on commençait à en avoir ras-le-bol de tuer au moins deux gros cafards tous les jours !

 


Où manger?

Il n’y a pas énormément de restaurants en ville et l’Anglais est encore moins répandu qu’ailleurs, malheureusement. On en a testé quelques-uns (locaux et pizzerias) et nous ne sommes régulièrement retournés que dans deux ou trois d’entre-eux:

  • « Mat Coffee – Dim Sum » : petite échoppe près de la fontaine au Nord. Les plats sont bon marché (2$/plat ou 1-2€) et les gens sont sympas. (Ils n’ouvrent que le soir)
  • Les échoppes en face de l’hôtel « Angkor Comfort Hotel ». Allez-y surtout pour les milkshakes qui sont très bons pour 0,75-1$ (0,6-0,8€). (Milkshakes toute la journée, mais il faut aller les réveiller pour les faire ;-))
  • « Mariyan Pizza House », près du temple Wat Sangker et de la populaire auberge « Here be Dragons ». On y a mangé tous les jours midi et soir pour 2-3$/pp par repas (en incluant des boissons). PS: Leur « iced coffee » est excellent et surtout non sucré
IMG_20180406_124230
Bami goreng et Iced Coffee
IMG_20180408_114018_1
Résultat d’un test de Queenie: Vous voulez un œuf au lait? Ah, mais on m’avait pas dit que l’œuf il arriverait cru…
IMG_20180408_115429
Lok Lak au porc (porc croustillant et riz à la vapeur
IMG_20180402_135907
Fruits de mer pimentés vendus dans la rue. On n’a pas osé testé (car on n’est pas fans)

Que faire ?

Comptez une deux jours maximum si vous voulez faire toutes les activités aux alentours:

  • Ferme aux crocodiles
  • Temple de Barseat
  • Temple de Wat Phnom Ek
  • Temple de Wat Sangker
  • Collines Phnom Sampeau/Sampov:
    • Killing Caves
    • Bat Caves
  • Colline de Phnom Banan:
    • Temple Wat Banan
    • Bamboo train

PS1: Tous les trucs à voir que j’ai listé ci-dessus se trouvent à minimum 15km de la ville, sauf la ferme aux crocodiles qui se trouve dans le nord de la ville et le temple Wat Sangker.

PS2: Lors du régime dictatorial de Pol Pot, les « Killing Caves » sont des grottes naturelles ayant servi de fosses communes pour les ennemis du régime Communiste de l’époque. Pas loin de 3 millions de personnes, principalement des gens et des familles qui ont reçu une éducation (professeurs, traducteurs, scientifiques, …), ont été torturées, assassinées et jetées aux oubliettes dans les grottes par le régime.

PS3: Les « Bat caves » constituent un grand réseau souterrain de grottes habitées par 6,5 millions de chauve-souris (« Wrinkle-lipped bats – Chaerephon plicatus), qui ont la particularité de sortir tous les jours un peu avant 18h au coucher du soleil pour chercher de la nourriture.  Elles peuvent manger 50-100% de leur poids (environ 15 grammes) par soirée, sous la forme de petits insectes comme les moustiques et criquets, qui peuvent détruire jusqu’à 60% des récoltes de riz, soit 2000 tonnes de riz par an. Vous imaginez donc bien qu’ici dans la région, elles sont limite vénérées!

 


Photos


Quelques photos de la ville

IMG_20180405_113046

IMG_20180409_134619

IMG_20180406_133917

IMG_20180406_134207

IMG_20180408_163146

IMG_3353

 

Quelques photos de la colline de Phnom Sampov

Killing Caves, temples et point de vue

IMG_3708
Scènes de torture infligées dans la religion Bouddhiste aux pêcheurs (alcooliques, couples adultères, parieurs, menteurs et voleurs)
IMG_3727
Réunion d’ossements

IMG_3755

IMG_3762

IMG_20180407_171140

Bat Caves

IMG_3825

IMG_3858

 

Quelques photos de la colline de Banan et son temple

IMG_3504

IMG_20180407_130508

IMG_20180407_131217

IMG_20180407_133416
Ces ruines sont antérieures de 100 ans par rapport aux temples d’Angkor

IMG_3599

 

 

C’est ici que notre voyage au Cambodge se termine avant de retourner en Thaïlande.  Pour ce trajet, nous avons réservé un bus chez la compagnie « Capitol Tours » (voir maps.me pour la localisation de leur bureau) pour 13$/pp (10,55€), départ à 7h45 du matin pour un trajet de 8-9 heures avant d’arriver à Bangkok.

 

Nos prochains articles concerneront la Thaïlande du Sud et notre article bilan sur le Cambodge. Vous êtes toujours très curieux vis-à-vis de nos bilans et ça nous fait très plaisir de vous voir nous suivre 😀

 

 

A) Siem Reap (FR)

Mise à jour de notre article sur Siem Reap et ses temples d’Angkor en Avril 2018

Période : 28/03/2018 – 04/04/2018

 

Quelques mots sur Siem Reap

Important centre touristique et économique de l’ouest du Cambodge et capitale de la province du même nom, Siem Reap est célèbre pour être la plus proche des temples d’Angkor,  situés à environ 10km de la ville.

Ces temples couvrent une surface de 400km² et regroupent un complexe de constructions majoritairement religieuses et quelques palais royaux construits par l’empire Khmer entre le 9ième et le 13ième siècle. A cette époque, la ville était située à l’intérieur du complexe et Angkor était la capitale de l’Empire. Le lieu de construction principal n’a pas été choisi par hasard. Il est situé entre le lieu d’approvisionnement des pierres (montagne Kulen, à 40km au nord) et la source de nourriture la plus proche (lac Tonle Sap).

Il y a trois principaux sites:

  • Temples d’Angkor (liste non exhaustive plus loin),  à environ 10km au Nord de SR
  • Temples de Bakong,  à 13km à l’Est de SR
  • Temple de Banteay Srei,  à 40km au Nord de SR

L’ethnie originaire du pays est un groupe appelés les Khmers,  alors que les Cambodgiens sont ceux vivant sur le territoire (Chinois,  Laotiens,  Vietnamiens, …).  La religion principale actuelle est le Bouddhisme Theravada, comme en Thaïlande, mais ce ne fut pas toujours le cas au cours de l’histoire. Avant le 10ième siècle,  le courant religieux suivi par la population était appelé « Animisme« , polythéiste, dans lequel les gens prient les dieux de la montagne,  des arbres,  des rivières,  etc et croient en l’énergie de la nature. Des sacrifices étaient courant. Plus tard, vers le 10ième siècle,  des marchands Indiens ont apporté avec eux l’Hindouisme et le Bouddhisme. Les temples d’Angkor sont d’ailleurs tous principalement dédiés aux dieux Hindous de la trinité (voir article sur Kathmandu ici). Ceci explique pourquoi les écrits dans les temples ainsi que leur véritable nom sont en Sanskrit. Les noms qu’on leur attribue aujourd’hui correspond plutôt à des diminutifs familiers donnés par les locaux (le temple Banteay Srei, le temple des femmes car il y a beaucoup de statues représentant des déesses, le temple Bayon,  car découvert recouvert d’arbres banyan – arbre très connu des Bouddhistes car c’est celui sous lequel Bouddha a atteint l’illumination,  etc).

Devenue la religion principale du Cambodge (qui comprenait alors 59 provinces au lieu des 25 actuelles), l’Hindouisme a perduré pendant plusieurs siècles (jusqu’au 15-16ième siècle), période à partir de laquelle le Bouddhisme a pris le dessus. Remarquons que parmi ces trois religions,  seul le Bouddhisme ne demande pas de sacrifices pour apaiser le(s) dieux. Pour celle-ci, vous devez simplement respecter les cinq piliers fondamentaux:

  • Ne pas tuer
  • Ne pas mentir
  • Ne pas voler
  • Ne pas commettre d’adultère
  • Ne pas boire d’alcool

Certains rois se sont également convertis à l’Hindouisme pour pouvoir conquérir des territoires car dans cette religion,  il est permis de tuer, ce qui devient bien pratique !

La vie nocturne dans le centre ville est également très animée. La Pub Street regroupe tous les plus grands bars et restaurants branchés. La majorité des visiteurs sont des touristes issus des quatre coins du monde.

La principale monnaie utilisée est le dollar Américain et tout est arrondi au 1$ près dans la rue. Dans les restaurants et magasins, pour ce qui coûte moins de 1$, tout est converti en KHR (Riels Cambodgiens, 1$ = 4000 KHR, 1€ = 5000 KHR). Un plat moyen coûte entre 1-5$,  mais une bouteille d’eau coûte 0,50-1,0$ ! Comptez en général 1$ si la bouteille vient du frigo.

PS: Pour économiser un peu sur l’eau, achetez des packs de 6 pour 1,5-2,5$ en grande surface plutôt qu’une par une dans les échoppes.


Comment atteindre Siem Reap depuis le Laos (depuis les 4000 îles)?

  • Trajet vers la frontière Laos – Cambodge. Plusieurs possibilités,  dont les deux suivantes :

 

  1. Bus depuis Pakse : 210.000 LAK/pp chez Laos Adventurer Tour (ticket sans date, vous pouvez l’utiliser quand vous voulez)
  2. Bateau de l’île de Don Det vers Nakasang et ensuite Bus depuis Nakasang : 235.000 LAK/pp (dont 4% de frais car nous avons payé par MasterCard)
  3. Bus depuis Nakasang : 210.000 LAK/pp

Sans savoir qu’il nous faudrait payer 4% par carte (il ne nous restait plus assez de cash), nous avons réservé un bus sur l’île de Don Det. Les bateaux en provenance ou en direction des îles coûtent 15.000 LAK/pp (depuis/vers Don Det) et 20.000 LAK/pp (depuis/vers Don Khone).

 

  • Trajet de la frontière vers Siem Reap :

 

Préparez-vous à passer un moment très désagréable en face des douaniers Laotiens corrompus, qui demandent des frais de 2$/pp pour vous apposer un tampon sur vos passeports.

Préparez-vous également à la corruption du côté du Cambodge, où les douaniers demandent 35$/pp par visa au lieu des 30$ officiels  (2018).

Quelques conseils et infos :

  • Comme pour le Laos, le visa se paie en Dollars Américains. Toutes les autres monnaies sont utilisables mais les douaniers appliqueront un taux de change complètement démesuré. Si vous n’en avez pas, on vous conseille de profiter de votre passage à Nakasang, avant de prendre le bateau vers les îles, pour retirer le maximum de LAK dans les ATM (1.500.000 ou 2.000.000 LAK) à côté de la station de bus. En face de ces ATM, il y a une banque avec un guichet où vous pourrez obtenir des USD à un super taux (0,8$ de frais pour échanger 1.250.000 LAK contre 200$). Ils ne prennent que quelques centimes de frais,  contrairement aux ATM qui prennent quelques euros…
  • Des « bonnes âmes » à la station de Nakasang vous proposent de leur donner 40$/pp pour s’occuper de tout. Nous n’avons pas accepté (mais presque 80% des passagers l’ont fait).  Au poste frontière, on les a vu ne donner que 20$ pour 20 passeports aux douaniers !
  • Quand ils vous demanderont de payer pour avoir les tampons de sortie du Laos, ne payez pas, mais restez devant leur bureau. Embêtez-les, chantez leur des chansons et refusez de payer! Ils vous diront alors de partir à l’immigration du Cambodge, qui vous refoulera car vous n’aurez pas de tampon. Nous ne sommes restés qu’une heure et avons payé 1$ par personne finalement, mais nous avons lu des blogs où les gens disaient être restés plus de deux heures pour avoir le tampon gratuitement…
  • Si quelqu’un vous dit que vous devez vous dépêcher sinon votre bus partira sans vous, ne l’écoutez pas, c’est bidon !

Où loger?

La majorité des guesthouses affichent un prix de minimum 15$ la nuit dans le centre et aux alentours de la Pub Street. Dans les auberges de jeunesse, les dortoirs sont à 6$/lit.

Nous nous sommes éloignés vers l’ouest de la ville, mais à moins de 2km du centre et avons logé à la « Mei Gui Guesthouse », pour seulement 7$/nuit en chambre avec sdb privée et ventilateur. Si vous voulez la climatisation, le prix passe à 10$/nuit. Les gens qui tiennent la guesthouse sont vraiment sympas et certains parlent même plutôt bien anglais.


Où manger?

La majorité des restaurants servent de la cuisine khmer et aussi Européenne. Les prix varient de 1$ à 10$, selon l’endroit.

Le long de la rivière, dans le centre, vous pouvez trouver des dizaines et des dizaines de stands de street food où tous les plats sont à 1-1,5$

Exotic Siem Reap Food

Khmer BBQ Siem Reap
Khmer barbecue
Lok Lak chicken Rice Siem Reap
Chicken Lok Lak et riz
Siem Reap Street Food (1)
Quelques photos de street food à Siem Reap

Siem Reap Street Food (2)

Siem Reap Street Food (3)


Que faire?

  • Temples d’Angkor, à 10km :
  • Tickets (qu’on obtient dans un bâtiment à 4km de la ville en direction des temples, sur maps.me, mais les tours organisés vous y emmènent systématiquement avant de rentrer dans le parc):
    • 1 jour : 37$
    • 3 jours, valable pendant 7 jours : 62$
    • 7 jours, valable pendant un mois : 72$
    • Small circuit tour : 10$/pp (tour en minivan de 16km, avec un guide anglophone)
      • Angkor Wat
      • Ta Phrom
      • Bayon
      • Porte Sud
      • Coucher de soleil à Bakheng Hill (s’il n’y a pas trop de nuages…)
    • Grand Circuit tour : 11$/pp (tour en minivan de 37km, avec un guide anglophone)
      • Banteay Srei
      • Neah Pean
      • Ta Som
      • Preah Khan
      • East Mebon
      • Pre Rup
  • Temples de Bakong, à 13km. Prix inclus dans le pass d’Angkor. Vous pouvez y accéder en vélo (1$/jour de location) depuis la ville, ou en tuk-tuk pour 20$.
  • Reproductions miniatures des temples d’Angkor, Bantey Srei et du Bayon (1,5$/pp). Situé dans le nord de la ville, mais pas très loin du centre, le lieu est tenu par l’artisan, un monsieur passé la septantaine, très sympathique et passionné. La visite est assez courte, mais plutôt cool.
  • Musée national d’Angkor
  • Parc proche du musée national d’Angkor et ses arbres remplis de chauve-souris qu’on peut apercevoir de jour comme de nuit. Il y a également un centre d’informations à cet endroit.
  • Pub street
  • Old Market

Quelques photos de la ville

Siem Reap
Vue d’un des ponts de la ville
Siem Reap Angkor Temples replicas (1)
Réplique d’Angkor Wat et son créateur : M. Dy Proeung (survivant du régime des Khmers Rouges)
Siem Reap Angkor Temples replicas (2)
Réplique du Temple Bayon par M. Dy Proeung
Angkor Temples map
Plan du site (sauf le temple de Banteay Srei, qui est 40 km au nord)


Quelques photos sur le Petit circuit des temples d’Angkor

Programme:

PS: Si  vous cliquez sur les noms des temples, en bleu et soulignés, vous atterrirez sur une page Wikipedia explicative 😀

 

Angkor Wat, temple dédié à Vishnu

Angkor Wat (1)

Angkor Wat (2)

Angkor Wat (3)

Angkor Wat (4)

Angkor Wat (5)

Angkor Wat (6)
Le souci du détail des artisans khmers: Au lever du soleil, la lumière rasante projette l’ombre des colonnes sur les murs et ça ressemble aux cinq tours d’Angkor !

Temple du Bayon

Bayon Temple (1)

Bayon Temple (2)

Bayon Temple (3)

Bayon Temple (4)


Temple de Ta Prohm (vu dans Tomb Raider, 2001)

Ta Prohm (1)

Ta Prohm (2)

Ta Prohm (3)

Ta Prohm (4)

Ta Prohm (5)

Ta Prohm (6)

Ta Prohm (7)

Ta Prohm (8)



Quelques photos sur le Gand circuit des temples d’Angkor

  • Bantey Srei Temple (érigé par Yasjnavaraha, le conseiller du Roi Rajendravarman II et Jayavaman  V au 10ième siècle AC)
  • East Mebon Temple (érigé par le Roi Rajendravarman II au 10ième siècle AC)
  • Neak Pean Temple (érigé par le Roi Rajendravarman II au 10ième siècle AC)
  • Preah Khan Temple (érigé par le Roi Jayavaman VII au 12ième siècle AC)
  • Ta Som Temple (érigé par le Roi Jayavaman VII au 12ième siècle AC)

PS: Si  vous cliquez sur les noms des temples, en bleu et soulignés, vous atterrirez sur une page Wikipedia explicative 😀

Bantey Srei Temple, temple en « sandstone » dédié au dieu Shiva

Bantey Srei Temple (1)

Bantey Srei Temple (2)

Bantey Srei Temple (3)

Bantey Srei Temple (4)

Bantey Srei Temple (5)


Ta Som Temple

Ta Som Temple (1)

Ta Som Temple (2)

Ta Som Temple (3)

Ta Som Temple (4)

Ta Som Temple (5)

Ta Som Temple (6)

Ta Som Temple (7)

Ta Som Temple (8)

Ta Som Temple (9)

Ta Som Temple (10)


Preah Khan Temple

Preah Khan Temple (1)

Preah Khan Temple (2)

Preah Khan Temple (3)

Preah Khan Temple (4)

Preah Khan Temple (5)


Neak Pean Temple

Neak Pean (1)

Neak Pean (2)


East Mebon Temple

East Mebon (1)

East Mebon (2)

East Mebon (3)

East Mebon (4)


Pre Rup Temple

Pre Rup Temple (1)

Pre Rup Temple (2)

Pre Rup Temple (3)

Pre Rup Temple (4)

 

Prochaine étape: Bus vers la ville de Battambang, où nous visiterons plusieurs grottes dont certaines témoignent encore des atrocités commises par les Khmers rouges.